Apr21
2014

By: admin                Categories: 3D AnimationGames

Previously, we discussed how to create a terrain object– short, that is, in comparison to the time it’d take us to develop our own terrain system from scratch. The landscape created so far, as well as the workflow used to create it, together offer an insight into the awesome potential of Unity as a game engine as well as, more generally, a time-saving tool.

The problem with our terrain at this stage is not its shape, form or texturing but rather its sparseness, its lack of set-dressing or props. The terrain is desolate: it has none of the hallmarks of a real-life terrain – no trees or grass or vegetation, no flourishing verdant life of any kind. It’s time for us now to fix that issue by adding trees and grass; and we’ll also add a first-person controller to the project so we can explore the terrain as a game character would be able to do. Consider the following steps.

1. Let’s add some trees to the level. The terrain package imported earlier in this chapter already contains a palm tree mesh that we can add to the terrain. This can be found in the Project panel under the folder Standard Assets > Trees Ambient-Occlusion > Palm. one way to add the palm tree would simply be dragging and dropping the tree mesh from the Project panel into the viewport and positioning it onto the terrain surface, just as we would with any other ‘regular’ mesh file. However, this approach would soon become problematic for at least two reasons. First, terrains typically feature many trees, and duplicating a tree mesh for each tree on the terrain would quickly become tedious work. Second, the terrain elevates and has contours, and we want each tree on the terrain to be positioned so that it matches the flow and elevation of the terrain: again, we could manually position each tree using the Transformation tools, but this too would be tedious work. The Terrain tools therefore offer a solution to this problem: they allow us to use the brush workflow again to paint the meshes onto the surface of the terrain. This means we can paint multiple meshes in one brush stroke and have all of those meshes conform to the elevation. To access these tools, select the Terrain mesh in the viewport, and press the Place Trees button from the object Inspector – it appears on the right-hand side of the Paint Texture button; see Figure 4.7 for more details.

(more…)

No Comments

Apr16
2014

By: admin                Categories: 3D AnimationGames

WHEN YOU NEED TO POPULATE a scene with buildings, you can do it with a long, arduous process, or you can do it the quick and easy way. Which would you prefer?

The Preserve UVs feature of the Editable Poly object makes it possible to visually shape the building right to the map without leaving the Front viewport.

1. Get a photograph of a building with a nearly straighton perspective. In Photoshop, correct the perspective distortion and clean it up. In this image, I’ve removed the flag, signage, and balcony from the facade. Note the background color, which is similar to the building color.

(more…)

No Comments

Apr14
2014

By: Elyse                Categories: 3D Animation

Skinning in Maya has changed many times over the years, but never more so than version 2011 and higher. Version 2011 introduced the concept of interactive skinning. With this concept the idea of skinning was changed so that any vertex could have many skinning inputs, all of which could do mathematical wonders together to move the geometry. The trick is to get everything “normalized,” or back into a 0–1 range. If you are using anything prior to 2010, there is a different way to skin. I won’t focus on those versions in this book—sorry.

First, let’s talk about the three different types of weight assigning.

1. Rigid bind: this allows a vertex to only have one joint influence it. It is an old method of skinning, still good for mechanical objects, and calculates extremely fast.

2. Smooth bind: this allows a vertex to have multiple joints influence it. You can paint smooth weights to fi ne tune the vertex/joint assignments. This “painting weights” is usually referred to when someone says they are “skinning.

3. Interactive skin bind: this is the newest method. It is, as it suggests, interactive. The workflow for this is to do an interactive skin bind first (as we have done in previous chapters). This method also allows you to paint weights for finer tuning after completing first rough adjustments with the interactive tool.
(more…)

No Comments

Apr09
2014

By: Elyse                Categories: 3D AnimationBooks

This tutorial is brought to you by Getting Started in Zbrush.

________________________________________________

The Stroke menu setting changes how the brush is applied to the surface. This is the left tray icon second from the top, just underneath the brush icon. The default setting for the standard brush is the Dots setting, which repeats the brush’s alpha along a given brush stroke line. Click on the Strokes pop-up menu to see the other available options.

For a much smoother stroke, use the Freehand setting. When ZBrush draws a stroke upon the surface it is repeating the brush alpha along the line of the stroke. The freehand stroke provides a much more tightly spaced interval of your brush alpha, creating a more continuous line. Pick a brush alpha and change the stroke to Freehand to try it out. At the bottom of the Stroke pop-up menu there are a number of sliders and buttons for modifying the behavior of each stroke. The Mouse Avg slider adjusts the smoothness of the brush stroke by averaging out the mouse’s position slightly before applying each stroke with higher values, providing a smoother movement.

The other stroke options include DragRect, Spray, ColorSpray , and DragDot . DragRect lets you control the size and orientation of each individual brush alpha you place on the model. Simply select it and click and drag the shape out on your object. As you move the mouse around while you drag out the shape you will notice how you can control its orientation.

DragDot is a quicker way of placing the same brush alpha individually. DragDot let you interactively place one copy of your brush alpha at a time. It is very similar to DragRect but sacrifices some control for speed of placement.

FIG 5.7 Brush Stroke pop-up menu

(more…)

No Comments

Mar31
2014

By: Elyse                Categories: 3D AnimationInspiration

By Richard Tilbury

Software Used: Photoshop

In this tutorial we will be painting a human eye. The first thing to do is to gather as many reference pictures as you can – including a mirror! You will notice that all eyes are unique in both color and shape, and that the skin will vary in every image. Lighting also plays a key role in determining how reflective the lens looks, as well as the skin itself. (more…)

No Comments

Mar17
2014

By: Elyse                Categories: 3D AnimationGeneral

For this chapter’s supporting exercise you will be creating a photoshoot scene similar to those that appear in the glossy motorsport magazines.

In this scene I have provided you with one Pontiac Solstice. Let’s go ahead and take a look at the scene.

For more information on this topic and to download the companion files, please visit www.focalpress.com/cw/Wylde (more…)

No Comments

Feb26
2014

By: admin                Categories: 3D AnimationAnimation

The envelope tool can help shave some time off your production schedule. In this case, the Envelope tool was used to deform the head of the Evil Mime character to represent the effect of being hit by a self-imposed upper-cut. Sure, the entire head could have been drawn, but not often do we have the luxury of time to start from scratch when a deadline is looming. It was much easier to start with the head already drawn and warp it to suit our needs.

(more…)

No Comments

Feb24
2014

By: Elyse                Categories: 3D AnimationAnimationBooks

Lauded as the most important principle, squash and stretch gives characters and objects a sense of flexibility and life. Also, this principle dictates that as characters and objects move and deform, their volume generally stays the same. Some of squash and stretch can be dictated by the object actually smooshing into something, such as a ball bouncing on the ground. With characters, squash and stretch can mean many different things. It can be combined with anticipation to make a character “wind up” for an action in a visually interesting way.

One example would be as a character prepares to move, he may squash his spine, making his figure bulge out. Then as he springs into motion, his form elongates and stretches thin to retain the same volume. Whenever possible, use squash and stretch on your characters to give a sense of strain (a character reaching for something high overhead), or to give a sense of fear (a character squashes into a little ball in a corner to avoid being seen by a predator). Start looking for squash and stretch in professional animation and in life, and you’ll see quickly how much this simple principle adds to the illusion of life we give objects and characters.

(more…)

No Comments

Jan29
2014

By: Elyse                Categories: 3D AnimationGeneral

I finally put these opinions down as my rules for rigging. These will not be everyone’s rules, for character setup is a very opinionated sport. To complicate things, there are a hundred ways to do everything, which makes it so challenging to learn. For this book we’ll use these rules and refer to them often. I found that if I started with these as a baseline for the basic concepts it helped manage the learning process and maybe even helped curb some chaos. Later, as you get into advanced topics you can choose what rule you want to break or altogether ignore, and develop your own rules of rigging. For now, here they are…

(more…)

No Comments

Jan13
2014

By: Elyse                Categories: 3D AnimationAnimationBooksGeneral

The Making of “ Renaissance”

By Marco Bauriedel

Software Used: Photoshop

The base image needed to be cleaned up first before anything else (Fig.01a). The second stage was to create an extension of the image, following the concept of leading onto a matte painting in which the National History Museum would be set in a natural environment, as if in existence sometime in the future. I started off by taking the base image of the National History Museum and painting/Clone Stamping the people out of it (Fig.01b). The Lasso tool was used to select parts of the image, which were then copied, rotated, flipped and scaled to fit into another location (Fig.01c). Making selections of a shape by guessing how it would continue in a covered/extended area, then Clone Stamping in some noise from a similar part of the image and color correcting it, is another nice way to work (Fig.01d). (more…)

No Comments
Older Posts » Newer Posts »